Langue française

  • Quichotte

    Salman Rushdie

    Sir Salman Rushdie has received many awards for his writing, including the European Union's Aristeion Prize for Literature. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and Commandeur de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. In 1993 Midnight's Children was judged to be the 'Booker of Bookers', the best novel to have won the Booker Prize in its first 25 years. In June 2007 he received a knighthood in the Queen's Birthday Honours.

  • ***SHORTLISTED FOR THE BOOKER PRIZE 2019*** In a tour-de-force that is both an homage to an immortal work of literature and a modern masterpiece about the quest for love and family, Booker Prize-winning, internationally bestselling author Salman Rushdie has created a dazzling Don Quixote for the modern age.

    Inspired by the Cervantes classic, Sam DuChamp, mediocre writer of spy thrillers, creates Quichotte, a courtly, addled salesman obsessed with television, who falls in impossible love with the TV star Salman R. Together with his (imaginary) son Sancho, Quichotte sets off on a picaresque quest across America to prove worthy of her hand, gallantly braving the tragicomic perils of an age where 'Anything-Can-Happen'. Meanwhile his creator, in a midlife crisis, has equally urgent challenges of his own.

    Just as Cervantes wrote Don Quixote to satirise the culture of his time, Rushdie takes the reader on a wild ride through a country on the verge of moral and spiritual collapse, with the kind of storytelling magic that is the hallmark of his work. The fully realised lives of DuChamp and Quichotte intertwine in a profoundly human quest for love and a wickedly entertaining portrait of an age in which fact is so often indiscernible from fiction.

  • NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A modern American epic set against the panorama of contemporary politics and culture--a hurtling, page-turning mystery that is equal parts The Great Gatsby and The Bonfire of the Vanities NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR PBS HARPERS BAZAAR ESQUIRE FINANCIAL TIMES THE TIMES OF INDIA On the day of Barack Obamas inauguration, an enigmatic billionaire from foreign shores takes up residence in the architectural jewel of the Gardens, a cloistered community in New Yorks Greenwich Village. The neighborhood is a bubble within a bubble, and the residents are immediately intrigued by the eccentric newcomer and his family. Along with his improbable name, untraceable accent, and unmistakable whiff of danger, Nero Golden has brought along his three adult sons: agoraphobic, alcoholic Petya, a brilliant recluse with a tortured mind; Apu, the flamboyant artist, sexually and spiritually omnivorous, famous on twenty blocks; and D, at twenty-two the baby of the family, harboring an explosive secret even from himself. There is no mother, no wife; at least not until Vasilisa, a sleek Russian expat, snags the septuagenarian Nero, becoming the queen to his king--a queen in want of an heir. Our guide to the Goldens world is their neighbor René, an ambitious young filmmaker. Researching a movie about the Goldens, he ingratiates himself into their household. Seduced by their mystique, he is inevitably implicated in their quarrels, their infidelities, and, indeed, their crimes. Meanwhile, like a bad joke, a certain comic-book villain embarks upon a crass presidential run that turns New York upside-down. Set against the strange and exuberant backdrop of current American culture and politics, The Golden House also marks Salman Rushdies triumphant and exciting return to realism. The result is a modern epic of love and terrorism, loss and reinvention--a powerful, timely story told with the daring and panache that make Salman Rushdie a force of light in our dark new age. Praise for The Golden House [A] modern masterpiece . . . telling a story full of wonder and leaving you marveling at how it ever came out of the authors head. --Associated Press Wildly satiric and yet piercingly real . . . If F. Scott Fitzgerald, Homer, Euripides, and Shakespeare collaborated on a contemporary fall-of-an-empire epic set in New York City, the result would be The Golden House . --Poets & Writers A tonic addition to American--no, world!--literature . . . a Greek tragedy with Indian roots and New York coordinates. -- San Francisco Chronicle

  • In the near future, after a storm strikes New York City, the strangenesses begin. A down-to-earth gardener finds that his feet no longer touch the ground. A graphic novelist awakens in his bedroom to a mysterious entity that resembles his own sub-Stan Lee creation. Abandoned at the mayor's office, a baby identifies corruption with her mere presence, marking the guilty with blemishes and boils. A seductive gold digger is soon tapped to combat forces beyond imagining.

    Unbeknownst to them, they are all descended from the whimsical, capricious, wanton creatures known as the jinn. Centuries ago, Dunia, a princess of the jinn, fell in love with a mortal man of reason. Together they produced an astonishing number of children, unaware of their fantastical powers, who spread across generations in the human world.

    Once the line between worlds is breached on a grand scale, Dunia's children and others will play a role in an epic war between light and dark spanning a thousand and one nights - or two years, eight months, and twenty-eight nights. It is a time of enormous upheaval, in which beliefs are challenged, words act like poison, silence is a disease, and a noise may contain a hidden curse.

  • HOME

    Salman Rushdie

    Salman Rushdie, a self-described 'emigrant from one place and a newcomer in two', explores the true meaning of home. Writing with insight, passion and humour, he looks at what it means to belong, whether roots are real and homelands imaginary, what it is like to reconfigure your past from fragments of memory and what happens when East meets West.

    Selected from the books Shame, Imaginary Homelands and East, West by Salman Rushdie VINTAGE MINIS: GREAT MINDS. BIG IDEAS. LITTLE BOOKS.

    A series of short books by the world's greatest writers on the experiences that make us human Also in the Vintage Minis series:
    Love by Jeanette Winterson Liberty by Virginia Woolf Race by Toni Morrison Sisters by Louisa May Alcott

  • An adventure novel about a son's attempt to rescue his father and return to him a special gift. The father is a professional storyteller. One day his wife leaves him to run off with a little clerk. The author also wrote "Grimus", "Midnight's Children", "Shame" and "The Satanic Verses".

  • Patries imaginaires réunit des articles que salman rushdie a publiés dans la presse britannique de 1980 à 1990.
    On y trouvera essentiellement des critiques littéraires sur des auteurs du monde entier : indiens ou britanniques, bien sûr, comme anita desai ou john le carré, mais aussi américains, comme kurt vonnegut ou philip roth, latino-américains comme garcia marquez ou vargas llosa, européens ou australiens, etc. a cet ensemble, s'ajoutent des articles politiques sur l'inde ou sur le pakistan, des articles sur la photocopie ou la peinture.

    Enfin, la dernière partie du livre réunit les textes de salman rushdie sur les versets sataniques et sur " l'affaire ".
    A travers ces critiques et ces réflexions, nous découvrons un écrivain engagé dans son siècle, fils de deux mondes et de deux cultures, ouvert, brillant, bien différent et bien plus riche que celui que le grand public n'a découvert qu'à propos de " l'affaire ".
    Patries imaginaires est aussi une réflexion sur notre monde et sur la place de l'écrivain et du créateur dans une société en mutation.
    Un livre essentiel sur cette fin de xxè siècle.

  • Joseph anton

    Salman Rushdie

    The Booker Prize-winning former president of American PEN shares the extraordinary story of how he was forced underground for more than nine years after he was sentenced to holy death by the Ayatollah Khomeini for his controversial novel, The Satanic Verses , describing how his family and he constantly moved and were under police protection in a dangerous life at the forefront of the battle for free speech.

  • THE GOLDEN HOUSE - A NOVEL

    Salman Rushdie

    • Knopf
    • 5 Septembre 2017

    Narrated by an aspiring filmmaker who gains the trust of Nero Golden, his sons Petya, Apu and D and Vasilsa, a Russian beauty who seduces Nero, this story focuses on the hope that brightens any dark situation while addressing dark topics. It is filled with love affairs, betrayal, violence and kidnapping amidst the dark background of an insane presidential candidate taking control of America.

  • Salman Rushdie is the author of fourteen novels - Grimus , Midnight''s Children (for which he won the Booker Prize and the Best of the Booker), Shame , The Satanic Verses , Haroun and the Sea of Stories , The Moor''s Last Sigh , The Ground Beneath Her Feet , Fury , Shalimar the Clown , The Enchantress of Florence , Luka and the Fire of Life , Two Years, Eight Months, and Twenty-Eight Nights , The Golden House and Quichotte (which was shortlisted for hte Booker Prize) - and one collection of short stories: East, West . He has also published four works of non-fiction - Joseph Anton , The Jaguar Smile , Imaginary Homelands , and Step Across This Line - and co-edited two anthologies, Mirrorwork and Best American Short Stories 2008 . He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University. A former president of PEN American Center, Rushdie was knighted in 2007 for services to literature.>

  • LANGUAGES OF TRUTH - ESSAYS 2003-2020 Nouv.

    B>b>Newly collected, revised, and expanded nonfiction--including many texts never previously in print--from the first two decades of the twenty-first century by the Booker Prize-winning, internationally bestselling author./b>/b>br>br>Salman Rushdie is celebrated as a storyteller of the highest order, illuminating deep truths about our society and culture through his gorgeous, often searing, prose. Now, in his latest collection of nonfiction, he brings together insightful and inspiring essays, criticism, and speeches that focus on his relationship with the written word and solidify his place as one of the most original thinkers of our time.br>br>Gathering pieces written between 2003 and 2020, Languages of Truth chronicles Rushdie''s intellectual engagement with a period of momentous cultural shifts. Immersing the reader in a wide variety of subjects, he delves into the nature of storytelling as a deeply human need, and what emerges is, in myriad ways, a love letter to literature itself. Rushdie explores what the work of authors from Shakespeare and Cervantes to Samuel Beckett, Eudora Welty, and Toni Morrison mean to him, often by telling vivid, sometimes humorous stories of his own personal encounters with them, whether on the page or in person. He delves deeper than ever before into the nature of "truth," revels in the vibrant malleability of language and the creative lines that can join art and life, and he looks anew at migration, multiculturalism, and censorship. The ideas, true stories, and arguments presented here are enlivened on every page by Rushdie''s signature wit and dazzling voice, making this volume a genuine pleasure to read.br>br>Languages of Truth offers the author''s most piercingly analytical views yet on the evolution of literature and culture even as he takes us deep into his own exuberant and fearless imagination.

  • On February 14, 1989, Salman Rushdie received a call from a journalist informing him that he had been "sentenced to death" by the Ayatollah Khomeini. It was the first time Rushdie heard the word fatwa. His crime? Writing a novel, The Satanic Verses, which was accused of being "against Islam, the Prophet, and the Quran." So begins the extraordinary story of how a writer was forced underground for more than nine years, moving from house to house, with the constant presence of an armed police protection team. Asked to choose an alias that the police could use, he thought of combinations of the names of writers he loved: Conrad and Chekhov: Joseph Anton. How do a writer and his family live with the threat of murder for over nine years? How does he go on working? How does despair shape his thoughts and actions, and how does he learn to fight back? In this memoir, Rushdie tells for the first time the story of his crucial battle for freedom of speech. He shares the sometimes grim, sometimes comic realities of living with armed policemen, and the close bonds he formed with his protectors; of his struggle for support and understanding from governments, intelligence chiefs, publishers, journalists, and fellow writers; and of how he regained his freedom. What happened to Salman Rushdie was the first act of a drama that is still unfolding.--From publisher description.

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