Livres en VO

  • Plongez en VO dans le magnifique roman épistolaire et découvrez, noatmment à travers les lettres de Jonathan, l'histoire du comte Dracula. Pour vous aider, des traductions en marge  vous permettront de bien comprendre le texte original. Ces textes en VO font partie des lectures imposées pour les classes de Première dans le cadre du nouveau bac de 2020.

  • Biographical noteAbraham 'Bram' Stoker (1847 - 1912) was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and joined the Irish Civil Service before his love of theatre led him to become the unpaid drama critic for the Dublin Mail. He went on to act as as manager and secretary for the actor Sir Henry Irving, while writing his novels, the most famous of which is Dracula. Maurice Hindle teaches at the Open University. Main descriptionPart of Penguin's beautiful hardback Clothbound Classics series, designed by the award-winning Coralie Bickford-Smith, these delectable and collectible editions are bound in high-quality colourful, tactile cloth with foil stamped into the designWhen Jonathan Harker visits Transylvania to help Count Dracula with the purchase of a London house, he makes a series of horrific discoveries about his client. Soon afterwards, various bizarre incidents unfold in England: an apparently unmanned ship is wrecked off the coast of Whitby; a young woman discovers strange puncture marks on her neck; and the inmate of a lunatic asylum raves about the 'Master' and his imminent arrival. In Dracula, Bram Stoker created one of the great masterpieces of the horror genre, brilliantly evoking a nightmare world of vampires and vampire hunters and also illuminating the dark corners of Victorian sexuality and desire.

  • Illuminates various aspects of Bram Stoker's haunting novel. This book investigates the many subtexts - from the masochistic, necrophilic, homoerotic and 'dentophilic' implications of the story to its political, economic, feminist, psychological and historical threads.

  • An ancient evil walks among them. When Adam Salton arrives at his grand-uncle's Derbyshire estate he quickly senses that a macabre and malevolent force is at work. In his attempts to uncover the grisly mystery, he encounters the chilling Lady Arabella and the obsessive Edgar Caswall, each harbouring their own dark and dreadful desires.

  • We print the words, you do the covers. We've published seven more Classics with naked front covers and this time there's a twist... Six of the titles have been chosen by six bands and they've all done their own covers for them. Why not design your own cover for My Penguinoe You can choose from Dracula, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, The Lost Estate, Aesop's Fables, Animal Farm, Steppenwolf and The Great Gatsby. Not forgetting The Picture of Dorian Gray, Emma, Meditations, The Waves, Grimm's Magic Tales and Crime and Punishment. Visit www.penguin.co.uk/mypenguin to find out more! That cover is naked, put something on it.

    When Jonathan Harker visits Transylvania to help Count Dracula with the purchase of a London house, he makes horrifying discoveries about his client and his castle. Soon afterwards, a number of disturbing incidents unfold in England: an unmanned ship is wrecked at Whitby; strange puncture marks appear on a young woman's neck; and the inmate of a lunatic asylum raves about the imminent arrival of his 'Master'. In the ensuing battle of wits between the sinister Count Dracula and a determined group of adversaries, Bram Stoker created a masterpiece of the horror genre.

  • Anglais Dracula

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    The quintessential horror tale of the powerful, centuries-old vampire follows his bloodthirsty trail from the mountains of Central Europe to England, until the savvy Dr. Van Helsing comes up with a way to end his reign of terror.

  • The Gothic Trilogy : Dracula, Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (unabridged versions) in one volume ! Three Classic Gothic Novels in One Book only ! 1) Dracula, 2) Frankenstein, 3) Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde -- all three classics complete and unabridged versions by Bram Stoker, Mary Shelley and Robert Louis Stevenson.

    1) Dracula is an 1897 Gothic horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker. It introduced the character of Count Dracula, and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy. The novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and of the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and a woman led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing. Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel, and invasion literature. The novel has spawned numerous theatrical, film, and television interpretations.

    2) Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley (1797-1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a hideous, sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Frankenstein is infused with elements of the Gothic novel and the Romantic movement. At the same time, it is an early example of science fiction. Brian Aldiss has argued that it should be considered the first true science fiction story because, in contrast to previous stories with fantastical elements resembling those of later science fiction, the central character "makes a deliberate decision" and "turns to modern experiments in the laboratory" to achieve fantastic results. It has had a considerable influence in literature and popular culture and spawned a complete genre of horror stories, films and plays.

    3) Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a gothic novella by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, first published in 1886. The work is also known as The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, or simply Jekyll & Hyde. It is about a London legal practitioner named Gabriel John Utterson who investigates strange occurrences between his old friend, Dr Henry Jekyll, and the evil Edward Hyde. The novella's impact is such that it has become a part of the language, with the phrase "Jekyll and Hyde" entering the vernacular to refer to people with an unpredictably dual nature: usually very good, but sometimes shockingly evil.

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